Conf42 Cloud Native 2024 - Online

Event-Driven Architectures: Orchestrating Cloud Native Workflows

Abstract

Unlock the power of event-driven architectures in the cloud! Join me on a journey through orchestrating seamless workflows, leveraging the latest cloud-native tools and strategies. Revolutionize your approach to building scalable and resilient systems.

Summary

  • Event driven architectures orchestrating cloud native workflows. Mustafal Mahmoud is a software engineer at Brain station 23. Will discuss some key factors to keep in mind when designing your own event driven systems. Will share some pro tips for building robust and scalable eventdriven.
  • Modern applications are inherently event driven. Event driven architecture place events at the core of application development. This shift unlock some amazing benefits like independent feature development, effortless feature integration, loose coupling, and modularity.
  • EDF promotes loose coupling. Higher components communicate through events instead of direct calls. This approach offers a significant advantage which we will explore in the next slide. By incorporating item potency, you ensure data consistency and reliable operations in your event even architecture.
  • Event streaming involves continuous flows of events or data providing a way to abstract producers and consumers. Choreography and orchestrating are the two models for how distributed system distributed application services communicate with each other. Many applications use a combination of both choreography and orchestration.
  • B bounded context is a fundamental concept in the domain driven design. In the choreography pattern shines the communication between bounded context. Every bundle context has the multiple microservice multiple services. This approach fosters loose coupling, scalability and flexibility as well.
  • Ostrating is another key pattern in the event event architectures. It's a particularly well suited for scenarios within bounded contest. By strategically combining choreography and orchestration, we can gain a powerful toolkit for building scalable, loosely coupled and adaptable event, even architectures.
  • Step functions can be used to model a KYC workflow, promoting an event driven approach with loose coupling and low code integration via event. Utilizing eventdriven simplifies integration between the KYC service and other domains requiring minimal custom code.
  • AWS state functions is a serverless orchestrating service that can seamlessly integrate with eventdriven architecture. There are two types of workflows in the functions, I mean standard and express. To choose the right workflow type depends on the specific needs.
  • State functions allows you to incorporate decision making into your workflows. In the human integration can even integrate human integration. Mappyset empowers us to process collections of items in the parallel using lambda functions. It works with Mapistet.
  • Event storming helps us visually map out a system behavior. Best practice is the OHS, I mean shared language for communication. Some scenarios require a guaranteed order for events to be processed correctly. Here are some helpful resources to keep your planning journey on event event architectures going.

Transcript

This transcript was autogenerated. To make changes, submit a PR.
Event driven architectures orchestrating cloud native workflows so this is the trending and important topic right now, right? So I'm super excited to explore it. And Eds all about using events signals that something has happened to orchestrate workflows and create responsive, scalable systems. So let's embark on journey together and unlock the potential. This is Mustafal Mahmoud working as a software engineer at Brain station 23. Also proud to be an AWS community builder in the serverless category for 2023. Excited to be here today as we explore the fascinating the world of event driven architecture. Throughout my journey as a software engineer, I have had the privilege of working on projects for leading bands in the various industries. Welcome to my session on eventdriven architecture. Today I will cover the basics of EDs. I mean I will break down what they are and the key concepts that make them why use the event event architecture and how to use it? Orchestration and versus choreography I will compare these two approaches to coordinating tasks in the eventdriven architecture. I will discuss some key factors to keep in mind when designing your own event driven systems. I'll share some pro tips for building robust and scalable eventdriven. Yeah, I will show you the live demo for error handling workflows following the ads architecture and I will wrap up at the end of this session with some helpful resources to keep your EDs journey going. So let's jump right in. So in today's dynamic world, applications are constantly responding to user sections and system changes. So eventdriven architecture place events at the core of application development. So modern applications are inherently event driven. I mean events are everywhere. So for example a customer placing an order, a social media post being created, or a sensor reading being uploaded. So event driven architecture place these events at the core of application development, transforming them from a byproduct into a powerful communication mechanism. So service publish events, something happened and subscribe to relief and events. I mean react to what happened, leading to loose coupling and faster development cycles. So there are some cloud providers like AWs, Azure, GCP. So they offered a comprehensive toolkit for building serverless event event architecture services like AWS Lambda, AWS, Amazon Kinesis for event streaming, Amazon SNS, SQS, etc. And Azure provides azure functions for serverless and azure app service for managed serverless. Also GCP provides cloud functions and so on. So there are some core values of event driven architecture. These are all about building complex applications. Unlike traditional architectures that constantly ping for updates, eventdriven architectures reacts to events in the real time. This shift unlock some amazing benefits. I mean independent feature development, effortless feature integration, loose coupling, and modularity. So imagine microservices like building blocks with AdA, teams can work independently on services that publish and subscribe to events. This reduces dependencies and lets you roll out new features much faster and effortless feature integration. I mean, adding new features becomes a breeze, right? So no need to modify existing applications. New features can simply subscribe to existing events like plugging into a real time information string for innovation. Event Architecture's SnConAs post sync lets your system handle massive volumes of events without bottlenecks. Plus, if one service fails, it doesn't bring down the whole system. Increase resilience for your applications. Services communicate through events, leading to cleaner, more modular code with less complex dependencies. This makes your application easier to understand, maintain and scale as your needs grow. I mean, it enhances flexibility and maintainability by reducing the impact of changes to one component or others. These are the core values. Working together create more flexible and robust foundation for your applications. So why the organizations follow the event driven architectures? So there are some strong points. So real time responsiveness event driven architecture enables applications to detect and response instantly to events triggered by users and systems, providing a seamless integration and interactive user experience with under low latency. So this real time responsiveness enhance user engagement and satisfactions. Eventdriven architecture facilitates seamless integration with external systems and services. This extensibility allows for integrating additional features and services to enhance the application's functionality. Finally, we get the opportunity to minimize the resource consumption. Unlike traditional request response model, event driven architectures minimize resource consumption by responding only to events, reducing delays, and improving server efficiency. This optimization enhance overall performance and resource utilization. Right? There are some key concepts of event, even architectures. I mean building blocks that work together to create a powerful communication mechanism. Let's break them down. So there are some key points. I mean events, event producers, event consumers, and event brokers. So let's say events signals that something has happened, an order created event, or a payment received event. These events are like little snapshots on in time describing a specific change that has occurred. They are also immutable, meaning once created, their content cannot be altered. This is especially beneficial in complex systems because it eliminates the need to constantly synchronize data across different components and event producers. These are the entities that create and publish events. Think of them as announcing something newsworthy. Event producers can be various components like UI, microservices, iot devices and other enterprise services. Or different kind of. It can be SaaS applications also and even consumers on the receiving end, we have event consumers that there are the downstream components that get triggered by events and event can have multiple consumers, each reacting in its own specific way. Event consumption can involve starting offloads, running analysis or updating database based on the receiving event. And another thing is point event brokers. Imagine event brokers as the communication hub. They act as intermediaries between producer and consumers, so it manages the publishing and subscribing of events. They buffer communication, ensuring producer and consumers don't need to be in sync with each other. Event bookers come in two forms, I mean event routers and event stores, event routers that actively push events to their subscribed consumers, and event stores where consumers can pull events on demand. So by understanding these key concepts very well, on your way to leveraging the power of the event, even architectures in your applications, let's talk about the coupling, how tightly concerned different parts of your application are. On one end of the spectrum we have type coupling. So let's see how this plays out. Development challenges scalability issues, reduced fault tolerance. So there are many complexity. So I mean, look at the image on the slide. An image in additional ecommerce applications where order processing, billing, shipping and inventory all rely on synchronous calls, a single service failure could disrupt the entire flow. This is where event event architecture comes in. EDF promotes loose coupling. Higher components communicate through events instead of direct calls. So this approach offers a significant advantage which we will explore in the next slide. I mean, it is considered the power of events. So let's see how the event driven architecture addresses the challenges of type coupling with loose coupling, making components communicating through independent events. Instead of relying on the direct calls in loose coupling components, components publish events about their step changes without requiring immediate response from others. Think of it as sending out messages, as announcements, components declare what happened, and interested parties can react accordingly on their specific way, own specific way. So in an event event approach, components only, we need to be aware of the events they publish and subscribe to, not the internal working of other components. As long as the event format remains consistent, changes in one component won't affect other component. Idem potency is the crucial part. So, item potency, imagine pushing a button and action happens exactly once, even if you pass it multiple times. There's the essence of item potency, ensuring an operation operation produces the same outcome after the first successful execution, regardless of the retries. So why the item potency is important here? This property becomes especially important in the event, even architectures. So when dealing with retries, a common practice for handling potential failures. For example, let's say a lambda function triggered by an order place defend. So if the function encounters an error during the initial execution because of server failure, because of Internet issue or anything else, the lambda service might automatically retry the invocation, right? So without item potency safeguard, this detriment could lead to complex, serious issue and duplicate orders, corrupted data and anything else, you name it. So how to achieve item potency here in this scenario? So we can include a unique identifier within each event as an eigen potency key. This key allows the system to recognize if an event has already been possessed, preventing unintended consequences from retirees. So by incorporating item potency, you ensure data consistency and reliable operations in your event even architecture. So there are some common patterns of event to end architectures. So first of all, point to point messaging. Actually, it's a fundamental pattern. It is like sending a message with a specific recipient in mind. So this is the essence of point to point messaging. In event driven architectures, messages are often delivered asynchronously, meaning the sender doesn't wait for a response before continuing messaging. Queues like this on the slide act as the middle ground, like mailboxes. So producers, I mean senders, put messages in the queue, and consumers, like receivers, retrieve them when they are ready. So on their own specific way when they are ready. Right? So this asynchronous approach ensures smooth communication, not enforced communication. So even if the receiver is temporarily unavailable. Plus, these cues act as buffers, preventing message loss if the receiver is overloaded, right? So there are several service that can be used as message queues. Popular options include Amazon SQs, I mean simple queue service, and Amazon MQ, powerful tools for reliable message delivery. And secondly, publish subscribe messaging. So published subscribe messaging is unlike point to point messaging, where messages are targeted to a single consumer. But published subscribe messaging allows messages to be sent to multiple subscribers, right? So instead of using queues, this pattern typically employs event routers such as topics or event buses. Examples of services supporting this pattern include SNS, I mean simple notification service. So simple notification service is used for topics. For the event buses, the Amazon eventdriven is used so in details to say, topics function as simple hubs for distributing message to subscribers. Event buses can provide more complex routing based on the message attributes. So here in the slide we see the blue and green rule with message one and message two accordingly. So the event bus will check the rules, I mean attributes, and then send them to the targeted consumers, I mean subscribers. Now I'll talk about the event streaming. It involves continuous flows of events or data providing a way to abstract producers and consumers. Unlike pubsub messaging, where messages are pushed to customers in event streaming, consumers usually pull for new events, so consumers maintain their logic for filtering events and keep track of their position in the stream. Event streams can consist of individual events like location updates in a right share app, or data points collected over time from iot devices. So data source can be anything like logs, business metrics, any other AWS services, and here in the middle point, data streams, actually a subset of event streams, interpret data over time and are often used for normally real time data analytics applications or data persistence use cases. So there are services supporting event and streaming performance like Amazon Kinesis data stream and Amazon MSk. I mean Amazon managed streaming for Apache Kafka. This is called the Amazon MSk. Okay, so this is the choreography and orchestration. This is the common pattern. Choreography and orchestrating are the two models for how distributed system distributed application services communicate with each other. So in the choreography pattern, we can say communication happens without a central controller, events flow between service and services and eservice reacts to events independently, not dependable with others. On the other hand, orchestration involves a central coordinating service that controls the interaction and order of service information. So we can say that while choreography promotes decentralized and flexibility, orchestration provides centralized control and coordination. So many applications use a combination of both choreography and orchestration, selecting the model that best fits with a specific use case. Actually so there are different use case vary on different uses pattern. In this slide I will talk about the bounded context. Actually. So bounded context is a fundamental concept in the domain driven design representing a core pattern in its strategies. Design approach strategic design section is dedicated to handling complex models and teams efficiently. In the choreography pattern shines the communication between bounded context. I mean as the same concept is in the slide the image, there are two bounded context, I mean sales context and the support context. So every bundle context has the multiple microservice multiple services. So I mean the 100 context, the one domain and one domain have the multiple services. So for example, in the ecommerce example, the order service and the inventory service, the order service focuses on creating, placing, order emitting and order placed event with the relevant details. There are many events but one domain order service. This is the bounded context. Another bounded context is the inventory service. I mean a separate boundary context subscribe to the events and manage stock levels. So importantly, both services can be made out of others internal topic, but the servicing. Please send the events and the inventory service reacts accordingly. This approach fosters loose coupling, scalability and flexibility as well. So event buses such as event trees can be used for the choreography. Okay, and now I'll talk about the orchestration in details. So, orchestrating is another key pattern in the event event architectures. So it's a particularly well suited for scenarios within bounded contest where you need to control the order of service calls, manage state, and handle errors or retries effectively. So to solve this problem here, orchestrating comes in. So for example, in the slide you can see the document processing in the insurance claims in this example. So consider the document processing boundary context with the insurance claims application. This context receives the document uploaded event and orchestrator service within the context first classifies the uploaded document using a document classifier service based on the classifications, I mean driver license or car image. So the orchestrator directs the workflows if it's a driver license, the extract driver license info, I mean detailed service parts, the information regardless of the document type, the extracted data is updated in a database. Finally, the document processing domain image the document accepted event with all the static details. So, orchestration provides a central centralized control mechanism for complex workflows and it ensures proper service execution, order, state management and error handling also, so leading to a more reliable and maintainable applications. So here some services to execution to execute these workflows. I mean AWS functions and Amazon managed workflows for Apache Kafka. So choreographer and orchestrating are complementary, I mean not mutually exclusive. So even many applications benefit from using both patterns for different scenarios. There are a few main points when both together come. I mean producer producer orchestrating consumers consumer orchestrating. Now here some key points comes in the producer. In the producer emits events via event breeze orchestrating the choreography approach and in the same line, the producer orchestrating part utilizes step functions within its bonded context for orchestrating API calls to Amazon API gateway. On the receiving end, consumers multiple consumers subscribe to events via choreography approach. I mean SNS topic app client, I mean SQS Lambda, Amazon API Gateway application load balancer and in the same receiving in one there is one consumer orchestration, I mean one consumer also leveraging the state functions for internal orchestrating within its boundary context. And it comes the same process. So the previous slides explored the choreography and organization independently, but however, their true power lies in their ability to be used together within the same applications. So as illustrated in the enhanced example, a producer can emit via event breeze for the choreographing consumption by various services simultaneously, the producers can leverage estate functions within its bounded context to orchestrate ape calls. So on the receiving end, consumers can subscribe to events choreographically, while one consumer might also employ functions for internal orchestration within its own boundary context. So we have the key integrate that. I mean, by strategically combining choreography and orchestration, we can gain a powerful toolkit for building scalable, loosely coupled and adaptable event, even architectures. So this approach empowers us to effectively model complex workflows and the interaction within our applications. There are few combining patterns. One of them fan out. I mean, distributing a single event to multiple subscribers. While individual patterns can address specific needs, I mean, the true power of event lies combining them strategically. So fan out pattern is a fundamental concept and actually it allows a producer to send a single message to multiple of subscribed consumers. This approach is particularly useful when sorry. So let's say, for example, let's say social media notification system where a user uses post creation triggers fan out events. This event might be of interest to various consumers, such as a service for generating activity feeds, another service for sending push notifications to followers, and a service for timeline updates. So the fan of pattern ensures all this communication. All these consumers receive the same event, enabling them to perform their tasks efficiently. Now I'll talk about the event filtering and routing. So it directs event to specific targets based on the predefined criteria. It inputs message relevancy for consumers and reduces unnecessary processing. I mean, event filtering and routing is a cornerstone of the flexible and targeted communication in the event even architecture. It enables us to define criteria that determine which events get delivered to specific consumers. This ensures that consumers only receive relevant to their dominant functionality to escape to remove the unnecessary to remove the getting the unnecessary messages. So Eventdriven can filter and route events based on predefined criteria. In shading, only ten events reach specific consumers. And now I'll talk about the event and message buffering. So it utilizes queues as a buffer to manage the message volume for downstream consumers. It ensures messages are delivered reliably, even if consumers are temporarily unavailable or overload. So here the event and message buffering pattern comes in. It promotes asynchronous communication and improves overall system resiliency. So now I'll talk about the workflow orchestrating and it is the more important on this session. This slide demonstrates how step functions can be used to model a KYC workflow, promoting an event driven approach with loose coupling and low code integration via event in the step number one, so we can say new account request event, right? So the process begins with the account system publishing and event signing a new account request. This event triggers the KYC workflows execution within a dedicated KYC service and the second step QIC verification. So this might involve tasks like identity verification and risk profile assessment. And then step three, identity check completion and step four, conditional events based on the risk assessment. I mean after risk profile assessment, the workflow publishes one of the two events depending on the outcome, I mean whether account approved or account and step five, given consumption by downstream services like both account and consumer service domain. There are two domains actually. So I have defined roles on the event prepas to process this KYC workflow, KYC outcome events. I mean, the account domain likely handles the account creation or further processing based on the account approved event, and the customer service domain might be notified for potential outage to the customer based on the account rejected event. From this example we have the summary. We have the benefits of this functional workflows in the event even architecture. So this approach promotes loose coupling as services don't rely on direct communication, they simply publish or subscribe to relevant events on the event principles. And another thing we can see in this example, the modular workflow is the function orchestrating the KYC process in a defined sequence, ensuring a clear and maintainable workflows, and also low code integration. Utilizing eventdriven simplifies integration between the KYC service and other domains requiring minimal custom code. So this is the low code integration actually. And by leveraging step functional eventdriven. So here we can see the financial institutions can establish the robust and scalable device workflow and ensuring regulatory compliance and efficient customer onboarding. So far we have explored the various aspects of event driven architectures. Now let's introduce AWS state functions. Actually, it's a serverless orchestrating service that can seamlessly integrate with eventdriven architecture. So there are some key components for step functions, workflow. I mean state machine steps and task steps. So state machine represent your entire workflow. There are few types of state machines, I mean twice state, parallel state and so on, especially a series of event driven steps. Here comes in another component is step within the workflow is called a step. Another component is task step. This step represent units of work executed by other AWS services, such as invoking the lambda and task that can interact with any other AWS service like SQs, SNS, SES, API, gateway and anything else. So the core benefit of the step function is the visual workflows design. And the graphical console provides a more clear view of the applications workflow, making it more easier, making it easier to understand and manage complex event event process. So use cases for the state functions could be maybe machine machine learning model of flow ETL workflows, long running workflows and so on. So state functions provide two main ways to interact with other services within our workflows. I mean SDK integration and optimized integration. And there are two types of workflows in the functions, I mean standard and express. So standard execution execution is the time to up to one year and exactly once workflows execution for this type and the pricing is also part transition. And to say use cases for this standard is ideal for long running auditable workflows where execution history and visual debugging are crucial. Express workflows at least once workflow execution and the execution time is up to five minutes. And to say pricing the part number and duration of execution and use cases of this exprs workflows is the perfect for high event rate workflows such as streaming data processing and iot data ingestion, et cetera. So to choose the right workflow type between the standard and express workflows, actually it depends on the specific needs. So eastern workflows are ideal for scenarios requiring strict execution order auditability and long running process. On the other hand, express workflows except in the hydro throughput scenarios where rapid event processing, event processing, streaming data processing, IIT data injection is essential here. All right, so let's dive into some practical applications for the step functions. So first of all, function orchestration. So imagine a complex of flow like processing a customer order step function access at orchestrating these tasks. So you can define a sequence of lambda functions where each function performs a specific steps. So I mean calculate total update, inventory, trigger shipment, et cetera. Systems visuals, these interactions ensuring everything happens in the correct order, and you can easily verify the flow and on the branching with choice state. So state functions allows you to incorporate decision making into your workflows. For instance, in a credit card application process, a choice state can evaluate the request credit limit. If it's below a threshold, the application can be automatically approved. However, exiting the threshold can route the application for manual review by a manager. So here's the branching example and for the error handling. So state functions offers mechanism to handle errors smoothly. I mean for example a customer registration where the chosen username is unavailable, a retry state could automatically attempt registration with a slightly modified username a couple of times. Alternatively, a cat state could intercept the error and suggest alternative usernames for the customer to choose from. In the human integration can even integrate human integration. Suppose you have a process requiring manager approval. So here functions can utilize callbacks and task tokens to send the task to lambda function that might notify the manager and wait for the addition before continue the workflow. So this is useful for scenarios when human intervention is necessary. So there are other use cases. Parallel processing dynamic parallel parallelism with map step parallel in the parallel processing the imaging converting a video file into different resolution for various devices. The parallel listed allows you to distribute this workflows amongst multiple lambda functions simultaneously. Significantly, it is speeding up the transcoding process compared to doing it one resolution at a time and dynamic realism. It works with Mapistet. Mappyset empowers us to process collections of items in the parallel using lambda functions. A good example is an order fulfillment scenario, so where you might have multiple items that need to be prepared for shipping. I mean the map state can trigger lambda functions to process each item concurrently. I mean checking availability, gathering the item, packaging it for shipment, et cetera. So now let's see the demo on error handling of course, and then I'll get to the slide. So error handling custom error functions as the throw new error this is a custom error state we have completed in the state functions we have two state machines, I mean error handling state machine with retry in the resource sections the copy I have to copy the ARN and paste. If the ARN is mismatched, the error comes in the error handling parameters. We can check the execution input and output and the state functions workflow. So this is a custom error. And here the output comes from the lambda functions and start execution. So to view the customer message the start execution in the graph inspector panel and review the input tape. So now handle the failure using catch. So your task, map and parallel strategies may contain a field name catch start execution task and error. So copy and paste the lambda ern of the error handling state machine with catch lambda. Now custom error and next workflows step in the custom error fallback. So when it catches this error it passes flow control to the fallback step. Custom error fallback so select the custom error fallback stating the graph inspector pan and building the input and output. So custom error fallback message this is a fallback from a custom lambda function exception. So this workflow exactly as expected. I mean it should show this is a fallback from a custom lambda function exception. And it does use the catch a timer error and error held ten function lambda to copy rn of this lambda. Put the ErN in the state machine where I want to execute the error. I mean sleep set timeout function error equals estate timeout and next timeout fallback next event Timeout fallback so let's see what happened. Click Save and execute. Accept the default input and click start execution. To view the input of the fallback state, select timeout fallback state Timeout Faultback Step time out Faultback Step input output this is fallback format timeout error. It works perfectly as respectively. Okay, and after finishing this demo, I'm deleting this spec. All right, let's talk about the best practices and while considering building EDA applications. So firstly, event storming. It's a collaborative technique that helps us visually map out a system behavior and identify those critical events in the event, even architectures. The idea is to bring together stakeholders from different areas of the system. We then facilitate a workshop where we can all together to visualize and discuss the systems, events and actions. The main goal here is to get everyone on the same page, everyone under the same umbrella, about how the system works and pinpoint those critical business events. ECST events I mean ECST event carried state transfer events, notification events like concise messaging informing consumers that something ECST events like a different approach. They act more like data carriers, more data carriers containing a richer payload, with more information relevant to downstream consumers. So imagine a user placing an order in an event, even architecture we can create an order placed event to notify downstream systems like inventory management or payment processing that a new order exists. So notification events essentially act a messenger, informing interesting consumers that something has happened. But on the contrary, Es ECST events have the more information, more metadata in the full details data. And another best practice is the confirmation pattern, is the straightforward approach for consuming events in the event. Even architectures in this pattern, downstream consumers directly utilize the events published by producers, senders without any modifications or transformations. And another point, Sel, I mean protecting domain boundaries, let's say two bounded contexts with distinct data models, business logic, and potentially even language. And SEl acts as a mediator between these contexts. So it provides a translation layer that safeguards data from one domain from corruption or misuse when consumed by another domain and another. Best practice is the OHS, I mean shared language for communication. OSA is open host services patterns. It promotes communication between bounded contests by establishing a shared public language. I mean, this language acts as a common ground for the data exchange, defined pro, accurate upon interfaces, contracts or schema or anything like this. And another perspective is the event fast thinking. Remember, event identification, event identification and design are the ongoing process, right? So regularly revisiting your events, ensuring that for ensuring they remain relevant to involve business events and business as well as business needs final best practice of the ordering and order and unordered events. Not all events need to arrive in the specific sequence, but however some scenarios require a guaranteed order for events to be processed correctly and understanding this distinction is vital for designing your ETF effectively and for example a scenario where an order updated event must be processed only after the corresponding order created event arrives. So to achieve this you can leverage service that guarantee event order. Here are a couple of options on AWS I mean Kinesis data stream order is preserved within the message in a shard and Amazon SQs FIFO I mean first in first out. So events are delivered within a message group ID in the order and here are some helpful resources to keep your planning journey on event event architectures going. I hope you found it informative and feel free to reach out if you have any questions. So yeah, have a good day.
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Md. Mostafa Al Mahmud

Software Engineer @ Brain Station 23

Md. Mostafa Al Mahmud's LinkedIn account Md. Mostafa Al Mahmud's twitter account



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